Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America

Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America

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non-fiction, , non-fiction, ebooks, non-fiction, famous-women, food, american-history, novff, 2022, read-me-to-feel-cultured, general-nonfiction, Food and Drink, Nonfiction, History, Biography, Feminism, Biography Memoir, North American Hi...

Who’s really behind America’s appetite for foods from around the globe? This group biography from an electric new voice in food writing honors seven extraordinary women, all immigrants, who left an indelible mark on the way Americans eat today. Taste Makers stretches from World War II to the present, with absorbing and deeply researched portraits of figures including Mexican-born Elena Zelayeta, a blind chef; Marcella Hazan, the deity of Italian cuisine; and Norma Shirley, a champion of Jamaican dishes.


In imaginative, lively prose, Mayukh Sen—a queer, brown child of immigrants—reconstructs the lives of these women in vivid and empathetic detail, daring to ask why some were famous in their own time, but not in ours, and why others shine brightly even today. Weaving together histories of food, immigration, and gender, Taste Makers will challenge the way readers look at what’s on their plate—and the women whose labor, overlooked for so long, makes those meals possible.

Title:Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America
ISBN:9781324004516
Format Type:

    Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America Reviews

  • Allison

    I was intrigued by this book from the title alone, but when the opening pages not only drove home the focus on marginalized voices but also set out to interrogate the role of capitalism in erasing the...

  • Dan

    Mayukh Sen's Tastemakers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America is a must read for anyone who enjoys, collects, or reads American cookbooks. Sen’s volume has chapters on Chao Yan...

  • Sahitya

    More of a 3.5. I think I saw this book being reviewed by one of the booktubers or bloggers I follow and immediately decided to try it out. I’ve been an immigrant for almost a decade but I’m not fo...

  • Pooja Mathur

    I liked the book in general. It read a little more like a textbook. I was hoping to read more narrative/opinion on the state of the world, capitalism, etc. and it's impact on these chefs. But outside ...

  • Sarah Miller

    This book was a pleasure to read and incredibly informative- I keep finding myself mentioning fun bits of information and stories from it to my friends. I love food but don't always find myself engros...

  • Olivia Law

    I felt like this book needed to give me more. Just as soon as I was getting really into one story of these incredible women, it was over. I needed more emotional connection, not just facts....

  • Emma

    Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America was a gripping read that managed to be both expansive in scope yet intimate. Sen does an incredible job placing the reader inside...

  • Frances Scott

    An interesting idea, unevenly written. Some chapters were riveting, others quite dry. The case the author makes that these women "revolutionized food in America" is not all that strong, except for may...

  • Carly Thompson

    Short biographical essays about 20th century immigrant women who introduced the food of their homelands to American audiences, primarily through cookbooks but also through restaurants, cooking schools...

  • Charu

    I wonder if this book could have benefited from a different editor as I was a bit disappointed by the writing, which seemed to lack rhythm. The biographies were fascinating, though. ...