Sea State: A Memoir

Sea State: A Memoir

by

netgalley, , subject-netgalley, 2021, non-fiction, non-fiction, class-in-britain, to-write-review, netgalley, arc, galleys, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Biography Memoir, Biography, Literary Fiction, Cultural, Relationships, True Story

A stunning and brutally honest memoir that shines a light on what happens when female desire conflicts with a culture of masculinity in crisis

In her midthirties and newly free from a terrible relationship, Tabitha Lasley quit her job at a London magazine, packed her bags, and poured her savings into a six-month lease on an apartment in Aberdeen, Scotland. She decided to make good on a long-deferred idea for a book about oil rigs and the men who work on them. Why oil rigs? She wanted to see what men were like with no women around.

In Aberdeen, Tabitha became deeply entrenched in the world of roughnecks, a teeming subculture rich with brawls, hard labor, competition, and the deepest friendships imaginable. The longer she stayed, the more she found her presence had a destabilizing effect on the men—and her.

Sea State is on the one hand a portrait of an overlooked industry: “offshore” is a way of life for generations of primarily working-class men and also a potent metaphor for those parts of life we keep at bay—class, masculinity, the transactions of desire, and the awful slipperiness of a ladder that could, if we tried hard enough, lead us to security.

Sea State is on the other hand the story of a journalist whose professional distance from her subject becomes perilously thin. In Aberdeen, Tabitha gets high and dances with abandon, reliving her youth, when the music was good and the boys were bad. Twenty years on, there is Caden: a married rig worker who spends three weeks on and three weeks off. Alone and in an increasingly precarious state, Tabitha dives into their growing attraction. The relationship, reckless and explosive, will lay them both bare.

Title:Sea State: A Memoir
ISBN:9780063030831
Format Type:

    Sea State: A Memoir Reviews

  • Sarah

    Wow ok, so I have some thoughts on this book. If you're intrigued by the part in the blurb where it mentions that the book is about the men who work on oil rigs, and, like me, you decide to pick up a ...

  • Audrey H

    I really liked this cover, but as somebody who just suffered through this entire book DON’T LET IT FOOL YOU, this is absolutely horrible. I’ll suspend my annoyance that this book wasn’t what I e...

  • Katie.dorny

    Dnf @ page 25 I have no time for a woman who feels sorry for herself by choosing to have an affair with a married man. Also this is meant to be about life on oil rigs not a self absorbed woman who wan...

  • Paul

    An exasperating book, which is not the book described on the blurb. Ostensibly a look at the world of off-shore oil workers passing through Aberdeen, if you want to find out about "an overlooked indus...

  • David Partikian

    Caveat Emptor This review is written by a member of the merchant marine with over 30 years of experience with dangerous blue-collar jobs that demand a double life, with three or four months on and thr...

  • Maisie

    Being a female offshore worker I was very intrigued when I saw this book advertised.The author wished to see what men were like without having women around and although other reviewers perhaps did not...

  • TheWomanCalledSun

    Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh, so this was disappointing. I was expecting a poignant literary fiction about the men that work on oil rigs. An industry cloaked in so much mystery it would make for a fascinating re...

  • Sarah Ellis

    A debut from a former journalist who writes with poetic precision. The book couples keen observational journalistic skills (including transcripts from interviews) with lucid prose, so exact, the words...

  • Louise

    This is not a book about the people who work offshore like the blurb implies. This is the story of a woman who moves to Aberdeen to interview men that work off shore and has an affair with a married m...

  • Bess

    Lasley writes well but "Sea State" was, for me, a struggle. For every passage I enjoyed, I had to endure three times that in cringe. She's quoted in a Guardian article saying that the first agent who ...