Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave): A Cookbook

Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave): A Cookbook

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cookbooks, , netgalley, cfa, hardcover, memoir-biography, in-our-bookshelf, netgalley, food, dnf, recipes, netgalley, 2021-reads, Food and Drink, Nonfiction

The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast.

Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the industry, you just . . . never cook at home.

But now, with a family to feed, Dave faces the same challenges as any home cook: how to make something as delicious as possible, in the least amount of time possible, with as little mess as possible. It’s no time for meticulous searing or searching for the perfect medium rare.

This is his guide to the culinary dark arts of substituting, adapting, shortcutting, and sandbagging, like par-cooking chicken in the microwave before showing you seven ways to blast it with flavor in a four-minute stir-fry or a ten-minute stew, because he is as tired as you are of doing things the hard way

Title:Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave): A Cookbook
ISBN:null
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    Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave): A Cookbook Reviews

  • emily

    An easy 5. Greatest advocate(s) of improv cooking. I'm all for it. I cook everyday; and for anyone who does the same, well, you lot know that there's just no room/luxury for precise recipes/measuremen...

  • Annie

    Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Cooking at Home is a well written guide by David Chang and Priya Krishna on making the most of readers' cooking skill in the home kitchen. Due out 26th...

  • Sara

    I loved the visuals of this book just as much as I loved the content. It's the kind of book that we should all have on our shelves as a reference book, but it is just as much fun to simply leaf throug...

  • =^.^= Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: July 23, 2021Publication date: October 26, 2021When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you have personally decided to basically continue on #maskingup a...

  • Amy Naidoo

    This may be the best cookbook I've read in a long time, and I own a lot of cookbooks. One fun thing about getting into this book is that both authors have a great online video presence, so when you're...

  • Alissa Avilov

    This book is honestly fantastic - it pairs the hot takes and no nonsense attitude you expect from David Chang with Priya’s thoughtful interpretations and, at times, conflicting perspective. This boo...

  • sara

    I love that this cookbook is written for real people, that it honors the microwave, and respects short cuts. The book itself is visually beautiful and wonderfully organized. My only issue is that it d...

  • Alpha

    I borrowed this from the library, but I'm seriously considering buying it for my cookbook shelf, which is a pretty high bar. (I buy about one physical book a year nowadays.) It is practical to the ext...

  • RH Walters

    I enjoyed the conversational, autobiographical tone of this book, and have already made the easy lunch of brown rice, sesame oil & furikake seasoning several times to great acclaim. The only problem i...

  • Margaux

    This is truly more of a "how-to-cook" book than a "cookbook." It gives insight into the idea behind preparing something, how you might approach a meat or type of dish, and different places you can go ...